Ben’s Oscar Predications

Ben’s Oscar Predications

Every year here at LonelyReviewer.com, we try to see how close we can get to predicting the Oscars. In years past, each of the bloggers have done their own list. This year, we decided we’d pick and feature one. Ben and I have always gone back and forth on whose picks are better, who gets more right, etc. This year, Ben’s list is featured, let us know what you think! – Vatche

The predicted winners are highlighted in bold.

Best Picture

Avatar
The Blind Side
District 9
An Education
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Precious
A Serious Man
Up in the Air
Up

Best Director

Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker”
James Cameron, “Avatar”
Lee Daniels, “Precious”
Jason Reitman, “Up in the Air”
Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Actress

Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”
Helen Mirren, “The Last Station”
Carey Mulligan, “An Education”
Gabourey Sidibe, “Precious”
Meryl Streep, “Julie & Julia”

Best Actor

Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”
George Clooney, “Up in the Air”
Colin Firth, “A Single Man”
Morgan Freeman, “Invictus”
Jeremy Renner, “The Hurt Locker”

Best Supporting Actress

Penelope Cruz, “Nine”
Vera Farmiga, “Up in the Air”
Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Crazy Heart”
Anna Kendrick, “Up in the Air”
Mo’Nique, “Precious”

Best Supporting Actor

Matt Damon, “Invictus”
Woody Harrelson, “The Messenger”
Christopher Plummer, “The Last Station”
Stanley Tucci, “The Lovely Bones”
Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Original Screenplay

Mark Boal, “The Hurt Locker”
Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”
Alessandro Camon and Oren Moverman, “The Messenger”
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, “A Serious Man”
Pete Docter, Bob Peterson, “Up”

Best Adapted Screenplay

Neil Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell, “District 9”
Nick Hornby, “An Education”
Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, and Tony Roche, “In the Loop”
Geoffrey Fletcher, “Precious”
Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner, “Up in the Air”

Best Animated Feature

“Coraline”
“Fantastic Mr. Fox”
“The Princess and the Frog”
“The Secret of Kells”
“Up”

Best Foreign Language Film

“Ajami” (Israel)
“The Milk of Sorrow” (Peru)
“Un Prophete (A Prophet)” (France)
“El Secreto de Sus Ojos (The Secret in their Eyes)” (Argentina)
“The White Ribbon (Germany)

Best Feature Documentary

“Burma VJ”
“The Cove”
“Food, Inc.”
“The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers”
“Which Way Home”

Best Art Direction

“Avatar”
“The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus”
“Nine”
“Sherlock Holmes”
“The Young Victoria”

Best Cinematography

“Avatar”
“Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“The White Ribbon”

Best Costume Design

“Bright Star”
“Coco Avant Chanel”
“The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus”
“Nine”
“The Young Victoria”

Best Editing

“Avatar”
“District 9”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Precious”

Best Make-Up

“Il Divo”
“Star Trek”
“The Young Victoria”

Best Visual Effects

“Avatar”
“District 9”
“Star Trek”

Best Original Score

“Avatar”
“Fantastic Mr. Fox”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Sherlock Hollmes”
“Up”

Best Song

“Almost There” from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Down in New Orleans” from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Loin de Paname” from “Paris 36”
“Take It All” from “Nine”
“The Weary Kind (Theme from Crazy Heart)” from “Crazy Heart”

Sound Mixing

“Avatar”
“Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Star Trek”
“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen”

Sound Editing

“Avatar”
“Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Star Trek”
“Up”

Documentary Short

“China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province”
“The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner”
“The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant”
“Music by Prudence”
“Rabbit a la Berlin”

Animated Short

“French Roast”
“Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty”
“The Lady and the Reaper (La Dama y la Muerte)”
“Logorama”
“A Matter of Loaf and Death”

Live Action Short

“The Door”
“Instead of Abracadabra”
“Kavi”
“Miracle Fish”
“The New Tenants”

Oscar Nominations Announced

Early in LA Tuesday morning, a good deal of people were up to hear the 2010 nominations for the Academy Award.  This is the first year of the Academy’s new ’10 best picture’ nominee concept. 

There is a lot of things to be excited about with this list of nominees, but a few things that upset me.  (That seems to happen every year.)  The full list is below.  Any oversights?  Any mistakes?  Let us know.

Best Picture

 “Avatar”

“The Blind Side”

 “District 9”

“An Education”

 “The Hurt Locker”

 “Inglourious Basterds”

 “Precious”

“A Serious Man”

 “Up in the Air”

“Up”


Best Director

Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker”

James Cameron, “Avatar”

Lee Daniels, “Precious”

Jason Reitman, “Up in the Air”

Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Actress

Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”

Helen Mirren, “The Last Station”

Carey Mulligan, “An Education”

Gabourey Sidibe, “Precious”

Meryl Streep, “Julie & Julia”

Best Actor

Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”

George Clooney, “Up in the Air”

Colin Firth, “A Single Man”

Morgan Freeman, “Invictus”

Jeremy Renner, “The Hurt Locker”

Best Supporting Actress

Penelope Cruz, “Nine”

Vera Farmiga, “Up in the Air”

Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Crazy Heart”

Anna Kendrick, “Up in the Air”

Mo’Nique, “Precious”

Best Supporting Actor

Matt Damon, “Invictus”

Woody Harrelson, “The Messenger”

Christopher Plummer, “The Last Station”

Stanley Tucci, “The Lovely Bones”

Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Original Screenplay

Mark Boal, “The Hurt Locker”

Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”

Alessandro Camon and Oren Moverman, “The Messenger”

Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, “A Serious Man”

Pete Docter, Bob Peterson, “Up”

Best Adapted Screenplay

Neil Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell, “District 9”

Nick Hornby, “An Education”

Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, and Tony Roche, “In the Loop”

Geoffrey Fletcher, “Precious”

Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner, “Up in the Air”


Best Animated Feature

“Coraline”

“Fantastic Mr. Fox”

“The Princess and the Frog”

“The Secret of Kells”

“Up”

Best Foreign Language Film

“Ajami” (Israel)

“The Milk of Sorrow” (Peru)

“Un Prophete (A Prophet)” (France)

“El Secreto de Sus Ojos (The Secret in their Eyes)” (Argentina)

“The White Ribbon (Germany)

Best Feature Documentary

“Burma VJ”

“The Cove”

“Food, Inc.”

“The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers”

“Which Way Home”

Best Art Direction

“Avatar”

“The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus”

“Nine”

“Sherlock Holmes”

“The Young Victoria”

Best Cinematography

“Avatar”

“Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”

“The Hurt Locker”

“Inglourious Basterds”

“The White Ribbon”

Best Costume Design

“Bright Star”

“Coco Avant Chanel”

“The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus”

“Nine”

“The Young Victoria”

Best Editing

“Avatar”

“District 9”

“The Hurt Locker”

“Inglourious Basterds”

“Precious”

Best Make-Up

“Il Divo”

“Star Trek”

“The Young Victoria”

Best Visual Effects

“Avatar”

“District 9”

“Star Trek”

Best Original Score

“Avatar”

“Fantastic Mr. Fox”

“The Hurt Locker”

“Sherlock Hollmes”

“Up”

Best Song

“Almost There” from “The Princess and the Frog”

“Down in New Orleans” from “The Princess and the Frog”

“Loin de Paname” from “Paris 36”

“Take It All” from “Nine”

“The Weary Kind (Theme from Crazy Heart)” from “Crazy Heart”


Sound Mixing

“Avatar”

“Hurt Locker”

“Inglourious Basterds”

“Star Trek”

“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen”

Sound Editing

“Avatar”

“Hurt Locker”

“Inglourious Basterds”

“Star Trek”

“Up”


Documentary Short

“China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province”

“The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner”

“The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant”

“Music by Prudence”

“Rabbit a la Berlin”


Animated Short

“French Roast”

“Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty”

“The Lady and the Reaper (La Dama y la Muerte)”

“Logorama”

“A Matter of Loaf and Death”


Live Action Short

“The Door”

“Instead of Abracadabra”

“Kavi”

“Miracle Fish”

“The New Tenants”

I Can See Clearly … Now What?

I Can See Clearly … Now What?

I woke up this morning and put on my old man pants, cappy, and decided to grampa it up.  I am full of “back in my day” and “you don’t know how good you have it!”  And, who doesn’t like a bitter old man ranting?!  Well, you’re in luck, the bitter old man store is stocked up and open for business.

High quality.  High definition.  4.8 magillion pixels refreshing at speeds so insane you’d need a degree in quantum physics just to even utter the words.  If you can’t see every detail on the screen, then what is the point of watching the movie?  Well, I think there are plenty of points left, actually.  In fact, if you want to me to be brutally honest, quality, or lack of quality, can actually be overcome.  Furthermore I would argue that, at times, it can be very useful.  I know this might come as a shock to people, but not everything needs to be super high definition for it to be considered worthy of viewing.

$300 million and we can see veins in their arms. So that's cool I guess.

And this is where I come to some big questions.  It seems to me we are at another crossroad with technology and how we are going to move forward with it.  How are we going to present it, market it, use it?  As far as I can tell, we are going to present this as the only way to watch movies.  To me this is bologna-shoes-on-an-icy-hill kind of slippery.  This is where we begin to tear at the seams of what really makes a movie great (hint: it isn’t just how pretty and bright and fluid we can make a film).  Now I am all for clarity (though I don’t require it)  but to market it as the sole reason to view or not view a movie is going to cut out a lot of worth while films.  Films that, for one reason or another, do not have the quality that a big blockbuster will have are being ushered to the side and ignored like they are herpes pie or something.  Is it not worth it to see these films?  It seems ridiculous to say it is not worth it, doesn’t it?  Ah, but we have been here before.  Look at the great older films, and even some contemporary films, that are filmed in black & white.  There is a good portion of people out there now that will not watch these because we have color, why would we watch a black & white film? They will never experience the love in Casablanca, or the comedy of Philadelphia Story, or the thrill of Double Indemnity.  Do we really want to raise a new generation of movie watchers to cut out even more films because they are “not high def enough?”

Killer of Sheep

Look closely enough and you'll see more than just see a kid in a dog mask.

I recently watched Killer of Sheep (I review it this week).  The sound was probably done by a garden hose, and at points the images on the screen were amazingly blurry.  Should this movie not have been watched?   No.  This was a beautiful film.  Part of the charm of it might have be precisely because of this lack of quality.  There was a real grittiness to it that made everything on screen seem that much more real.  I entered that world and was allowed to play.  Sure I bumped into a few things because I couldn’t see where the hell I was going, but that just made it more interesting.  It asked a lot from me as a viewer, and in return I got more out of it.

It's a Wonderful Life

You tell Jimmy Stewart he's too blurry to watch. I can't.

I have heard countless times the words, “once I saw a movie in HD I couldn’t watch one any other way,” and it saddened me.  There are plenty of beautiful movies that will never have this quality to it.  This should not be held against them.  These films can be some of the most beautiful stories ever told, even if they are slightly less clear.  Now, I am not saying that I don’t think an HD film looks good, but I hope that is never the sole reason I want to watch a film.  There are far too many films that would fall by the wayside if quality of image were the only measuring stick used.  Avatar may have been a visually stunning movie, but, as is predicted, if it is ushering in a new style of film and film quality, let us not forget the blurry shoulders upon which this visual marvel stood to view the new film landscape.  I would hate to live in a world where It’s A Wonderful Life gets lost because it doesn’t live up to the HD standard.

Golden Globes Wrap-Up

Golden Globes Wrap-Up

So, ‘Avatar’ takes Best Director and Best Picture at the Golden Globes and the world splits into half.

Last night’s Golden Globes presentation was an excellent show, with host Ricky Gervais lampooning everything from Mel Gibon’s alcoholism, to the drama in the world of Late Night NBC. Overall though, I think it was a great night, with the only thing sorta striking me as surprising being Avatar taking Best Picture and Best Director!

Not that I didn’t think it was a possibility. I do think out of all the films nominated, ‘Avatar’ will be the most timeless given its technical achievements, but I was pretty sure Hurt Locker (coincidentally directed by James Cameron’s Ex-wife Kathryn Bigelow) would win in the best picture category. That said, I’m happy ‘Avatar’ won, I think it echoes exactly what Martin Scorsese said last night regarding Cecil B. Demille. ‘Avatar’ much like DeMille’s films, was a spectacle, and an achievement in the new direction that film is heading in. So, therefore, Cameron earned his prize, and I’m glad he did

Other noteable prizes in the night were ‘The Hangover’ for Best Picture (Comedy or Musical), Sandra Bullock & Jeff Bridges for Best Performance (Drama), and Robert Downy Jr. and Meryl Streep for Best Performance (Comedy or Musical).

The most deserved award of the night went to Christoph Waltz, whose performance in Inglourious Basterds made the movie. Hope the Academy follows suit with this one.

‘The Hangover,’ though extremely fun and entertaining, winning over (500) Days of Summer was a little strange for me, though, I don’t really think of 500 Days as a comedy, but, the Golden Globes are funny that way.

I love that the Golden Globes also focus on Television, and it was great to see ‘Dexter’ getting a lot of recognition, as well as Glee.

In summary, I think it was a fun entertaining telecast, and I think the results of the night should make for an interesting Oscar night.

For a full list of winners click here.

Is There No Mystery Anymore?!

Is There No Mystery Anymore?!

Remember in Saved by the Bell: The College Years when Zack was presented with an opportunity to cheat on his ethics test?  Professor Lasky in his infinite wisdom and long luscious locks set up a test where he “accidentally” left the answer key on the floor for his students to find.  Every student cheated, except for Zack, and by not cheating Zack actually passed the real test.  (I sort of hope that Jeremiah Lasky prepared for this to happen and had some sort of curve or retest set up, because failing everyone on the final is a bit crabby.  And nobody likes a crab, Jeremiah.)   Remember?  Of course you don’t remember.  Nobody but me, TBS and Bob Golic supported this show.  Anyway, there is a lesson in this: sometimes it is better not to know and see what happens.  Sometimes it is better to just know the subject of the test and then accept the challenge.  And sometimes it is better if you marry Kelly Kapowski in the regular course of a TV series and don’t wait for a horrible made for TV movie.

This eventually leads me to a big old nasty bone I have to pick with movies.  I used to go to a movie and be excited about previews.  What was coming up was almost as exciting as what I was about to watch.  I would go online, look up trailers and maybe even make a decision to spend the $10 to see this movie or wait until the DVD.

I don’t do this anymore.  I can’t.  Watching these trailers is turning into watching a compressed version of the movie.  I know some of you are all like, “yeah, no doy, that’s what a trailer is!” but let me explain my expectations.  I expect a trailer to present to me the genre, a mood, and maybe a theme, nothing more.   What I am getting from a trailer is so much big-fat-overstuffed-burrito more.  I am getting looks at the first, second, third and last acts of the movie.  I sometimes even see the last image of the movie!  That makes me kick-kittens kind of angry.

Take Paranormal Activity, for example.  The most powerful thing about this movie was that we didn’t know what was coming.  It is a low budget movie that finds a real strength in the unknown, creates fear in what they are not showing.  It not only works well for this movie, but it is very very necessary for this film to be successful.  What does the trailer do?  It shows you the very last scene in the movie.  Way to take the element of surprise and toss glitter and a neon sign on it.  The entire movie I am sitting there thinking: when are they going to show the guy flying through the air?  Oh, at the very end.  Cool.  Glad I knew that was coming.  So instead of being shocked I am leaving the theater a bit unfulfilled and a little embarrassed that I was hugging the guy in the seat next to me for no reason since the big scare never really came.

Plenty of other movies are doing this too.  Some do it in a way that, even though the context is missing, you still see the last scene.  Avatar did this.  Quarantine did this.  The Hangover didn’t do this for the theatrical release, but the DVD trailer is definitely giving away a big piece of the story by mentioning that the Doug they traded for with that horrifically annoying Mr. Chow (seriously, he is like the equivalent of every pet peeve everyone has ever had, walking up to me and punched me in the nuts) was not their Doug.  “Classic mix-up.” (PS – Not funny.)   I have plenty of issues with The Hangover-rated, and maybe they are assuming that only four people have yet to see this movie so they can’t really ruin any surprises (or maybe it doesn’t matter, which is another problem entirely), but if your story is a paper thin as this story is, giving away a key plot point is most likely something you want to avoid.

If you were a reading type of person and the back of the book replaced the synopsis with the Cliff Notes, you’d be all, “OMG why did you tell me the end?”  And rightfully so!  People get all kinds of huffy if you spoil the ending of a book, why don’t we get just as mad about a movie?  Maybe a book is more work so we feel a bit more invested if we spend three weeks reading something only to hear the end of it from some jerkstore at a party that thought it would be funny if he spoiled it for you.  I don’t like this line of reasoning, though.  I am invested in a movie.  Don’t ruin it for me before I even decide to see it.

There are a lot of lessons to take from Saved by the Bell: pegging pants is cool, do not use the schools science supplies to bottle pasta sauce, in a pinch you can hire out of work actors to be your dad for meetings with the principal.  These are all good life lessons that Mr. Morris trail blazed for us, but maybe the biggest lesson we can take away from Zack & Co. is that sometimes avoiding the temptation to sneak a peak at the answers is really the best thing we can do … and don’t let Kelly Kapowski go.  You gotta lock that down.

Stick to teasers and peer recommendations.

-Brandin

Vatche’s Best of 2009

So another year, another list. I had to think long and hard about my favorite movies of 2009, since I do feel like it was such a great year so full of great films. Though, I will admit, I missed on quite a few which I can’t include on my list.Some of the films I still have yet to see that are getting huge acclaim are, ‘Up in the Air,’ ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox,’ and ‘A Serious Man,’ just to name a few.

So this is my list, with links to their respective Lonely Reviewer articles.

Up

It’s funny, having recently read quite a bit about how Pixar came to be, it is extremely interesting how often Pixar has changed the game and moved things forward continuously since Toy Story. With the first Toy Story, they proved people wrong, showing audiences that you can make a great feature film entirely using CGI. With ‘A Bugs Life’ they proved they could do it again. With ‘The Incredibles’ they proved they could make a film that would cater to both adults and younger audiences. With ‘Up,’ they showed us yet again their capability of crafting a film with a very mature storyline, and making it accessible to all audiences. ‘Up’ has to be one of the most emotional movies I’ve seen all year, and if you didn’t see this film, you’re doing yourself quite a disservice.

District 9

Another must see of 2009. An extremely original story, with an extremely original style. ‘District 9’ was 100x better then any Halo movie would have been, and I’m glad Peter Jackson and Neill Blomkamp didn’t give up on their collaboration when Halo was canceled. Brilliantly acted, amazing effects, and a great story.

Star Trek

I’m a nerd, plain and simple. I won’t deny it. I’ve been a fan of Star Trek since my Mom packed my lunch in my Star Trek the Next Generation lunchbox in the 1st grade. In fact, I’ve been always entertained by ALL the Star Trek films, even the “bad” ones. However, I was slightly skeptical of the remake, but, I just kept repeating my mantra, trust in J.J. The man couldn’t have made a more perfect film. Stunning production design, great acting, and a very fun story.

500 Days of Summer

I saw this film at IFFBoston ’09, months before the actual release of the film. ‘500 Days,’ is a great film, a realistic telling of a relationship between a man and a woman. Though the characters aren’t entirely likable (I won’t tell you whose side I was on), the acting is stellar, and the storyline, extremely relatable. Definitely one of the better, more unique relationship films of the past few years, up there with ‘Eternal Sunshine’

Avatar

Honestly, what more can I say about this film. I’ve never left a theater feeling more stunned in my life. It’s been a long time movie-goers have seen something this epic in terms of technological advancement. It was a fun film, with something for everyone.

The Brothers Bloom

The Brothers Bloom was a great movie that was not served well do it’s terrible trailer. I saw the film as the opening night presentation at IFFBoston ’09. I was blown away, such a tight story with a very unique style from director Rian Johnson. After I got home, I decided to pull up its trailer, and I couldn’t believe the way they were portraying it. I know its a story about con men, but its not Oceans 11. If I’d seen the trailer, I probably would have never gone to the movies! Coming off such a great original film, ‘Brick,’ this new effort from Johnson is not to be missed.

Inglourious Basterds

I’m not the biggest fan of Tarintino. His films are great, but something about them always bother me in someway. That said, I do believe ‘Basterds,’ is the filmmakers best work. Like ‘Bloom,’ the trailer did not do this film justice, however, they were probably banking on audiences finding this movie due to Brad Pitt, rather then the true reason this film was what it was, Christoph Waltz, the actor who played the Nazi Jew Hunter. If this man doesn’t walk away with a Best Supporting Actor trophy, I won’t know what to say.

The Hangover

The film that made actor Zach Galifianakis a household name. ‘The Hangover’ was definitely my favorite comedy of the year, though it was a very strong year, with films like ‘I Love You, Man’ and anything else starring Paul Rudd. Todd Philips’ outrageous Las Vegas Bachelor Party film earns a top spot as the movie that made me laugh the most. But, if you haven’t seen this yet, it must be dark under that rock you live under…..

So that’s it, my favorite movies of 2009! Let me know what you think in the comments, if you disagree, and of course, movies you think I should see that would definitely be on this list!

Happy New Year everyone!

Vatche Reviews: Avatar

Vatche Reviews: Avatar

AvatarHaving been forced to wait over a week to see it, it’s been hard for me not to be influenced by what other people had to say about it. Universally, the consensus from my peers has been, see this movie.Now.Up until then, I’d avoided every single piece of promotional information, review, and no opinion greater then 140 characters. A daunting task considering ‘Avatar’ is probably the most hyped movie since the new Star Wars trilogy.

So what did I think? (Note: I seriously recommend you just see the movie and not read this review, I’ll try to keep the detail to a minimum)

‘Avatar’ tells the story of Jake Sully (Sam Worthington), a former Marine who lost his legs in the line of duty, and his adventures on Pandora, a world that takes six years to travel to from a [what is suggested to be] a dying Earth. Jake is taking the place of his dead Brother, who had trained to control through a “mind-connection” a genetically engineered Na’vi, the 10-foot tall blue indigenous population of Pandora. With little training, and a lot to prove, Jake takes on this task with one thing in mind, to prove everyone wrong.

Which he does, by earning the trust of the Na’vi, through Neyti (Zoe Saldana). The Na’vi decide to train this foreign warrior in their ways. The humans looking to take over Pandora to mine it for their own personal gain see this as an opportunity to learn what the Na’vi want in exchange for allowing the Humans to mine for their ore. Others, like the hardass Colonel Miles Quaritch (Stephene Lang) see this as an opportunity to learn the weakness of the Na’vi, and exploit it if they need to.

James Cameron has fully succeeded in creating a world that feels incredibly real, a culture of creatures that make you question whether or not what you are looking at is actually CG. The detail in the Na’vi down to their teeth made me wonder how long it must have taken to individually animate each one of these characters. The detail in everything, from the moss on the trees, to the individual pieces of splintered wood, this movie looked amazing. The CGI at work here is leaps and bounds beyond anything we’ve seen in the past decade, and its ironic that it comes at the end of it.

The story is essentially Pocahantas, Dances with Wolves, and Fern Gully all tied in-together, but honestly, I have no qualms with that. Cameron makes you so familiar with the world you are in, that you buy all of it. Performances were as good as they could have been all around. Sam Worthington is excellent, say what you will about this guy, I dig him, he was the best part of Terminator: Salvation, and he shines here.

All-in-all, I loved this movie, right down to its very core. So in short, what is ‘Avatar?’ It’s a journey, an enjoyable one, and a journey I recommend everyone to embark on. And please. Only in IMAX 3D.

‘Avatar’ Numbers: Grosses $77M

So Avatar made a few million more then originally thought. The new 3D experience from James Cameron reached $77 million in the US Box Office, and is expected to continue to benefit from positive word of mouth.

The worldwide tally put Avatar at 242.5 million, well on its way to hopefully make a profit as it stands to be the most expensive motion picture ever made.

The total of $77 million is on the lower side considering most of the East coast was buried by a powerful blizzard (which was the reason I didn’t get to go, unlike Sam, a much braver fellow then I).

The record of highest grossing December film is still ‘I Am Legend’ which grossed $77.2 on its opening weekend.

Review: Avatar

Review: Avatar

ENT HOLIDAY FILMS

With the pre-release rumblings and talk before the release of James Cameron’s latest movie, it’s hard not to walk into “Avatar” without having some thoughts about what you are about to watch. [Read more…]

Cameron Talks “Avatar” Sequels

James Cameron is one week away from the opening of “Avatar,” one of the most talked about movies of the year.  Already the question is being asked, ‘what’s next?’  Cameron is said to be working on a remake of “Fantastic Voyage,” the story of scientists shrunk down and placed into the blood stream of a patient.  However, he’ll only be producing.  What about an “Avatar” sequel?  Cameron says it’s very possible.

Cameron says that he can envision a second and third movie in the story and, in fact, it’ll be cheaper than the first.  Part of the high cost of the first movie came from the cost to create the programs to animate the movie.  Cameron says with that cost out of the way, the cost of any sequel would be much cheaper than the first movie.

Press screenings of “Avatar” have started only in the past few days and, so far, the reviews are very good.  Both Variety and the Hollywood Reporter have positive reviews.